About Me

Cinematographer/Director. 

Walt Lovelace began his career as a cameraman and editor with the pioneering video production company Banyan in 1983, cutting his teeth on groundbreaking projects such as the cultural series Gayelle. He shot and directed his first music video in 1989, Ras shorty I - Watch Out My Children, leaving Trinidad shortly after to spend a year in New York, where he worked as a second unit cameraman. 

 

On returning to Trinidad he co-founded Earth TV, under whose banner he directed several productions including the environmental series Ecowatch There, he began forging a reputation as one of the region’s top cameraman/directors, becoming known especially for his technically accomplished and visually innovative work in music videos for groups such as 3 Canal, which often mixed film and video. 

 

Lovelace has also been associated with the television sports magazine Caribbean Sports Digest, whose early visual style he was responsible for developing. In 2001 Lovelace co-founded another company, Big Fish In A Blue Bottle. With this company he shot and directed commercials for a number of leading advertising agencies in Trinidad and the Caribbean. 

 

In 2004 Lovelace embarked on his first feature film project Joebell and America as Director of Photography and Editor. The film was directed by his sister Asha Lovelace and based on a short story written by his father, novelist Earl Lovelace.

 

Lovelace has shot and directed documentaries throughout the Caribbean region and also in the US, UK, Austria, Mexico and Turkey. He was also part of the only local video crew to cover the first few days of the July 1990 coup attempt in Trinidad.

In 2002 Lovelace co-founded Beach House Entertainment an audiovisual and event design partnership that develops media solutions and hosts events - the most prominent being the world-famous “Beach House Carnival” annual Trinidad carnival event. 

 

In 2011 Lovelace came up with the co-idea and creative concept for Carnival TV and for the first time Trinidad & Tobago carnival in all its glory was streamed in brilliant HD video to 750,000 people across the world. 

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